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Tag Archive | "Women"

Interview with Mae Stella Oxóssi

Friday, March 13, 2009

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Interview with Mae Stella Oxóssi

In a morning of Wednesday, between a query and another, Mother of Stella Oxóssi received us in the house of Xangô and talked about the priesthood, the history of Candomblé in Bahia and Ilê terreiro Axé OPO Afonjá. The conversation was not long, because, as always, a queue of people waiting for their advice.

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Iyami Osoronga

Friday, February 20, 2009

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Candomble Film Highlights Mae Stella

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

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Candomble Film Highlights Mae Stella

The documentary film A Cidade das Mulheres (The City of Women) directed by Lazaro Faria, presents an intimate view of African religious traditions in Bahia, Brazil. It features Mae Stella de Oxossi, perhaps the most influential figure in Bahia’s Candomble community.

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Womens’ Traditional Afrikan Martial Arts Class

Wednesday, September 17, 2008

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The African Martial Arts Institute is opening a branch school in Riverdale, GA! In addition to exciting traditional Afrikan martial arts classes for adults and youth, we are also teaching the acclaimed NZINGA: Mother / Daughter Self-Defense Program, for women and girls ages 11 and up!

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Gelede/Egungun Festival

Monday, June 9, 2008

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Gelede/Egungun Festival

The annual Gelede festival honors the creative and dangerous powers of women elders, female ancestors, and goddesses, known affectionately as "our mothers." Odun Egungun festivals are held in communities to commemorate the ancestors. Egungun masks are performed during these annual or biennial ceremonies as well as during specific funeral rites throughout the year.

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D’Haifa, Women and Orisa Odu

Thursday, June 5, 2008

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Date: Thu Mar 13, 2003 8:17 pm
Subject: PRESS RELEASE–D’Haifa title taken!!!!!

ERIWO YA!!! ERIWO YA!!! MARCH 4,2003

From: International Council for Ifa Religion

To: World Wide Ifa Order

This Council has been viewing and growing concerns on the ongoing controversy surrounding the report being circulated in effect that one Ms. D’Haifa who is also the Yeye Araba, claims to be in possession of Orisa Odu, which was purportedly given to her by the Olu-Isese, the Araba of Ife , and Chief Makonranwale Adisa Aworeni. This development has generated unprecedented unease and disquiet within and outside the World Ifa Community. The Council, in order to set the records straight, hereby makes the following clarifications:

1. It is forbidden for any female of whatever religious or spiritual extraction to be in possession of, handle or view Orisa Odu. This is not in any way discriminatory against womanhood but rather, it is purely and strictly in consonance with the tenets of Ifa as expressed in Ofun Meji 16:4, Irete-Osa 221:8; Irete-Ofun 226:18 and Otutupon-Rete 194:11.

2. Any female claiming to be in possession of or handles, or views Orisa Odu has therefore broken a major taboo of Ifa and has herself to blame for the physical and spiritual consequences of her actions.

3. The Council equally notes that neither Ms. D’Haifia nor her association has any record with the International Council for Ifa Religion, the umbrella body of all Ifa adherents the world over.

In conclusion, the Council makes the following declarations:

1. All females are strictly warned in their own physical and spiritual interests never to contemplate acquiring Orisa Odu, let alone touching or viewing it. It will do them no good whatsoever, since failure to own one does not detract them from their spiritual
essence in any way.

2. If any female claims to own an Orisa Odu, such a female is doing so, contrary to the tenets and injunctions of Ifa. In this wise, those women in possession of Orisa Odu in whatever shape or form should consider it of no spiritual value, since those from whom they claimed to have collected the Odu, are well aware of the inexorable fact that it is an abomination for a female to own, keep or view Orisa Odu.

3. For bringing the name of Ifa and womanhood into disrepute and for dragging the revered of Ifa I the mud and by generating avoidable controversy, the International Council for Ifa Religion (of which the Araba of Ife is Chairman, Board of Trustees) hereby withdraws the
chieftaincy title of Yeye Araba from Ms. D’Haifa with immediate effect.

4. The Council hereby warns all charlatans, impostors, fakes and unethical practitioners of Ifa to desist forthwith as there will be no hesitation to invoke all necessary corrective measures on anyone, no matter his/her position within the Ifa Community.

5. All Temples and Associations of Ifa worship in all parts of the world are hereby advised to register with the Council unfailingly and as soon as possible to avoid being denied all rights and privileges associated with membership of the Council.

PROFESSOR IDOWU B. ODEYEMI
Balogun Awo Agbaye & President
CHIEF SOLAGBADE POPOOLA
Secretary-General

CHIEF FASINA FALADE
Olubikin of Ile-Ife
Member

Board of Trustees: Chief Aworeni, Professor Wande Abimbola, Chief Oyewole Odenmakinda, Chief Odutola Akinpelu, Professor Idowu Odeyemi, Chief Ifayikua Odutola, Chief Adeboye Oyesanya, Chief Awodiran Agboola

Date: Thu Mar 13, 2003 8:17 pm
Subject: PRESS RELEASE–D’Haifa title taken!!!!!

ERIWO YA!!! ERIWO YA!!! MARCH 4,2003

From: International Council for Ifa Religion

To: World Wide Ifa Order

This Council has been viewing and growing concerns on the ongoing controversy surrounding the report being circulated in effect that one Ms. D’Haifa who is also the Yeye Araba, claims to be in possession of Orisa Odu, which was purportedly given to her by the Olu-Isese, the Araba of Ife , and Chief Makonranwale Adisa Aworeni. This development has generated unprecedented unease and disquiet within and outside the World Ifa Community. The Council, in order to set the records straight, hereby makes the following clarifications:

1. It is forbidden for any female of whatever religious or spiritual extraction to be in possession of, handle or view Orisa Odu. This is not in any way discriminatory against womanhood but rather, it is purely and strictly in consonance with the tenets of Ifa as expressed in Ofun Meji 16:4, Irete-Osa 221:8; Irete-Ofun 226:18 and Otutupon-Rete 194:11.

2. Any female claiming to be in possession of or handles, or views Orisa Odu has therefore broken a major taboo of Ifa and has herself to blame for the physical and spiritual consequences of her actions.

3. The Council equally notes that neither Ms. D’Haifia nor her association has any record with the International Council for Ifa Religion, the umbrella body of all Ifa adherents the world over.

In conclusion, the Council makes the following declarations:

1. All females are strictly warned in their own physical and spiritual interests never to contemplate acquiring Orisa Odu, let alone touching or viewing it. It will do them no good whatsoever, since failure to own one does not detract them from their spiritual
essence in any way.

2. If any female claims to own an Orisa Odu, such a female is doing so, contrary to the tenets and injunctions of Ifa. In this wise, those women in possession of Orisa Odu in whatever shape or form should consider it of no spiritual value, since those from whom they claimed to have collected the Odu, are well aware of the inexorable fact that it is an abomination for a female to own, keep or view Orisa Odu.

3. For bringing the name of Ifa and womanhood into disrepute and for dragging the revered of Ifa I the mud and by generating avoidable controversy, the International Council for Ifa Religion (of which the Araba of Ife is Chairman, Board of Trustees) hereby withdraws the
chieftaincy title of Yeye Araba from Ms. D’Haifa with immediate effect.

4. The Council hereby warns all charlatans, impostors, fakes and unethical practitioners of Ifa to desist forthwith as there will be no hesitation to invoke all necessary corrective measures on anyone, no matter his/her position within the Ifa Community.

5. All Temples and Associations of Ifa worship in all parts of the world are hereby advised to register with the Council unfailingly and as soon as possible to avoid being denied all rights and privileges associated with membership of the Council.

PROFESSOR IDOWU B. ODEYEMI
Balogun Awo Agbaye & President
CHIEF SOLAGBADE POPOOLA
Secretary-General

CHIEF FASINA FALADE
Olubikin of Ile-Ife
Member

Board of Trustees: Chief Aworeni, Professor Wande Abimbola, Chief Oyewole Odenmakinda, Chief Odutola Akinpelu, Professor Idowu Odeyemi, Chief Ifayikua Odutola, Chief Adeboye Oyesanya, Chief Awodiran Agboola

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Eepa Oya O!: Ol’Oya Speaks Out

Thursday, May 8, 2008

36 Comments

Eepa Oya O!: Ol’Oya Speaks Out

Oya, is a beautiful and powerful Orisa and her ruling odu is Osa Meji. Oya was the Queen of Ira and she was not from Nupe. Before she became Sango’s wife she had a kingdom of her own. Nevertheless, one cannot mention Oya (Ayaba Sango) without mentioning her husband Sango, for it was Sango who took Oya away from her original husband Ogun. It was also Oya, who was responsible for “permanently borrowing” Ogun’s original tools, which were his implements of war; hence, these tools became a part of her arsenal. Out of 16 rival goddesses vying for Sango, Oya who won his heart through her graceful movements, elegance, charm and personality. Warrior queen Oya, the loyal and favorite wife of Sango would often go into battle by her husband’s side and is known to be indispensable to her husband in every way. She is the strong wind that precedes the thunder. She can fan any fire set by Sango’s thunderbolts into a high blaze and she also has the ability to use forked lightening, to assist him in his battles. It is said that without Oya Sango cannot go into battle. She is also known for her intelligence, independence, fearlessness, gracefulness, sensuality, power, razor-sharp tongue, and deep intense passion.

Heavy winds, tornadoes, hurricanes, rainstorms, cyclones are also associated with Oya. She is theowner of the wind (Afefe). It is she who assists us with rapid inner and outer transformation. Oya, is about absolute change and is not a slow or very patient energy. She also governs over the Niger River and is the Mother of Egungun, (Iyagan meaning firm mother). Egungun (the Ancestors) is the embodiment spirits of a deceased one, who returns from Orun Rere (heaven) to visit his/her people. Oya is the protectress of the tradition and ancestral customs. She is the Orisa of rebirth.

Ol’Oya Types

Oya and Oya-types are known for their clairvoyance, psychic abilities, intuition and the ability to communicate the dead. She is the owner of the Marketplace (Mama Loja). She is a revolutionary and social crusader who fights for the underdog. Oya is a deity who is efficient, strong-willed, and very indispensable in emergency situations. Her power sweeps over all injustice, dishonesty, deceit from her path. Although unpredictable, Oya understands everything, but will only accept the truth. You may not like what is being said or even HOW it is said, but know that Oya speaks the truth. She hears all, sees all and gives of herself selflessly and places other’s needs before her own.

Oya is the guardian of the realm between life and death and she assists those when they make their final transition. The lungs, bronchial passages, and mucous membranes are associated with her. She can either hold back the spirit of death or call it forth; hence, she is the last breath taken. Oya also governs over the cemetery and the dead and is said to have entered the earth’s crust at Ira, upon hearing that Sango died. Oya is associated with the buffalo (Oya Gidigidi); hence, it is good to have buffalo’s horn (rubbed with camwood) on one’s altar for her. She is known for using charms and magic and is known as one of the Great Mothers of the “Elders of the Night (Witches).”

Oya’s the mother of disguises and has many different faces (masks). Many say that Oya is a great amazon who is said to have grown a beard when preparing for war. Legend tells us that no one wants to face Oya in battle for she is as fierce, ruthless, and cunning as any man. She is known to have destroyed towns, villages, uprooted all that was once in its’original state. No one wants to deal with the wrath of Oya or any other Orisa for that matter. We offer epo pupo to supplicate her and shea butter to calm her.

On a windy day, one should pray to Oya, humbly and sincerely of-course, for it is her messenger Afefe (the wind) that carries messages to her. She is not an Orisa to be taken for granted or lightly. Ghede Nimbo, is the aspect of Esu that assists Oya. Upon entering a cemetery or performing ancestral rituals, ceremonies, ebos, or any rituals always appease Ghede Nimbo first. Offer pennies and/or candy, epo pupo (palm oil), oti (gin), obi (kola nut), adura (prayers), and oriki(chants)/orin (songs) to open the way and ensure of blessings and protection.

Although she is both feared and loved. It is said and commonly known that Oya is very loyal to her children and dangerous to their enemies. She can come as smooth and cool as a warm summer breeze or as violent and vicious as a tornado and wreak utter havoc in your world. Oya is about business and she demands and commands respect!

Oya is associated with the colors: maroon, purple, deep dark red, orange, browns, multi-colors, burgundy, and cooper. Her number is 9 and in astrology is compared to the planet Pluto and the sign Scorpio and her metal of choice is copper.

Some of her foods are: female goat, eggplant, cooked corn meal, grape wine, grapes, gin, rum, kola nuts, plantains, palm oil, rooster, hen, black beans w/rice, anything spicy, fruit, okra soup, fish, cornstarch porridge, and akara.

Icons or effergies associated with Oya are: buffalo’s horns, masks, swords, iruba (horse tail whisk), pennies, whips, anything copper, camwood (which she loves), a broom, pictures of hurricanes, tornadoes, cyclones, wind instruments, anything associated with the wind and she loves cloth.

Her taboos are: smoke, palm kernel oil, ram, pork (depending on your road).

Some ewe (herbs) associated with Oya are: Comfrey, Pleurisy Roots, Horehound, Chickweed, Peony, Elecampane, Royal Poinciana, Star Apple, Flamboyan, Yucca, Caimito, Cypress, and Grains of Paradise just to name a few.

Here are some Oriki/Oyin for Ghede Nimbo, for the Egungun, and for Oya.

Oriki/Orin Ghede Nimbo:

Ghede Nimbo, Ghede Nimbo

Okunrin to bulewa

Ghede Nimbo, Ghede Nimbo

Onibode ile iku

repeat 1st verse

Ghede Nimbo Ghede Nimbo (repeat once)

Ghede Nimbo, Ghede Nimbo

Okunrin to bulewa

Ghede Nimbo Ghede Nimbo

Onibode ile iku

Oriki/Orin Egungun:

Mojuba fefe iku, mojuba fefe iku

Mojuba fefe iku, mojuba fefe iku

Iku o, iku o yin ti lo si joba Egungun

Iku o, iku o yin ti lo si joba Egungun

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Arabara arabara arabara egungun arabara

Arabara arabara arabara egungun arabara (repeat 3 times)

Eegun arabara, eegun arabara, egungun arabara

Repeat 1st verse

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wole wa Egungun, wole wa . Wole wa Egungun wole wa. Wole wa Egungun wola wa,

o o o wole wa.

Repeat verse

Oriki/Orin Oya:

Oya wima wima, Yansa wima wima oko to bembe aseni Oya

Oya wima wima, Yansa wima wima oko to bembe aseni Oya

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Oya gwa e de, Oya gwa e de

Eegun wan ile Oya gwa e de

Repeat 1st verse

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Oya Oya Ayaba Sango

Oya Oya Ayaba Oyo ile o

Oya Oya Ayaba Sango

Oya Oya Ayaba Oyo ile o

Repeat verse

I could go on and on about my Iya; however, I do not want to seem biased! Being a devoted and humble servant of the Orisa, one must never forget it is not about who dobale or kunles to you, how many ase oke, agbadas or ilekes you have, or how many titles or names you have ~ it is about the Egungun, the Orisa, and Olodumare! It is not about you or me, it is about reverence, worship, and your servitude them. It is about having iwa pele manifest through your daily words and actions. It is about carrying one’s self in a manner that will not shame one’s self, community, Egungun, Orisa, or Olodumare.

I love my mother dearly with all of my heart and each day is a new transformation for me. The power of the Orisa is amazing and I believe it is safe to say that if Oya is your ruling Orisa, we are truly blessed. Even if she is not your Orisa, you are still blessed because you are a child of Olodumare, a child of the Orisa, and your have the ability to contribute something positive to your community or nothing at all.

The author: My name is HRG (Her Royal Grace) Olori (Queen) Oyadele and I greet everyone in the name of the Egungun, the Orisa, and Olodumare. I was initiated and trained to Oya and coronated (as a Queen) in the Republic of Benin, West Africa and I would like to give my insight of Oya from a Beninese perspective.

This article is the sole property of sole property of Her Royal Grace Olori Oyadele. And can not be republished or reproduced in any form without her express permission. Please contact the HRG at: olorioyadele@aol.com

Oya, is a beautiful and powerful Orisa and her ruling odu is Osa Meji. Oya was the Queen of Ira and she was not from Nupe. Before she became Sango’s wife she had a kingdom of her own. Nevertheless, one cannot mention Oya (Ayaba Sango) without mentioning her husband Sango, for it was Sango who took Oya away from her original husband Ogun. It was also Oya, who was responsible for “permanently borrowing” Ogun’s original tools, which were his implements of war; hence, these tools became a part of her arsenal. Out of 16 rival goddesses vying for Sango, Oya who won his heart through her graceful movements, elegance, charm and personality. Warrior queen Oya, the loyal and favorite wife of Sango would often go into battle by her husband’s side and is known to be indispensable to her husband in every way. She is the strong wind that precedes the thunder. She can fan any fire set by Sango’s thunderbolts into a high blaze and she also has the ability to use forked lightening, to assist him in his battles. It is said that without Oya Sango cannot go into battle. She is also known for her intelligence, independence, fearlessness, gracefulness, sensuality, power, razor-sharp tongue, and deep intense passion.

Heavy winds, tornadoes, hurricanes, rainstorms, cyclones are also associated with Oya. She is theowner of the wind (Afefe). It is she who assists us with rapid inner and outer transformation. Oya, is about absolute change and is not a slow or very patient energy. She also governs over the Niger River and is the Mother of Egungun, (Iyagan meaning firm mother). Egungun (the Ancestors) is the embodiment spirits of a deceased one, who returns from Orun Rere (heaven) to visit his/her people. Oya is the protectress of the tradition and ancestral customs. She is the Orisa of rebirth.

Ol’Oya Types

Oya and Oya-types are known for their clairvoyance, psychic abilities, intuition and the ability to communicate the dead. She is the owner of the Marketplace (Mama Loja). She is a revolutionary and social crusader who fights for the underdog. Oya is a deity who is efficient, strong-willed, and very indispensable in emergency situations. Her power sweeps over all injustice, dishonesty, deceit from her path. Although unpredictable, Oya understands everything, but will only accept the truth. You may not like what is being said or even HOW it is said, but know that Oya speaks the truth. She hears all, sees all and gives of herself selflessly and places other’s needs before her own.

Oya is the guardian of the realm between life and death and she assists those when they make their final transition. The lungs, bronchial passages, and mucous membranes are associated with her. She can either hold back the spirit of death or call it forth; hence, she is the last breath taken. Oya also governs over the cemetery and the dead and is said to have entered the earth’s crust at Ira, upon hearing that Sango died. Oya is associated with the buffalo (Oya Gidigidi); hence, it is good to have buffalo’s horn (rubbed with camwood) on one’s altar for her. She is known for using charms and magic and is known as one of the Great Mothers of the “Elders of the Night (Witches).”

Oya’s the mother of disguises and has many different faces (masks). Many say that Oya is a great amazon who is said to have grown a beard when preparing for war. Legend tells us that no one wants to face Oya in battle for she is as fierce, ruthless, and cunning as any man. She is known to have destroyed towns, villages, uprooted all that was once in its’original state. No one wants to deal with the wrath of Oya or any other Orisa for that matter. We offer epo pupo to supplicate her and shea butter to calm her.

On a windy day, one should pray to Oya, humbly and sincerely of-course, for it is her messenger Afefe (the wind) that carries messages to her. She is not an Orisa to be taken for granted or lightly. Ghede Nimbo, is the aspect of Esu that assists Oya. Upon entering a cemetery or performing ancestral rituals, ceremonies, ebos, or any rituals always appease Ghede Nimbo first. Offer pennies and/or candy, epo pupo (palm oil), oti (gin), obi (kola nut), adura (prayers), and oriki(chants)/orin (songs) to open the way and ensure of blessings and protection.

Although she is both feared and loved. It is said and commonly known that Oya is very loyal to her children and dangerous to their enemies. She can come as smooth and cool as a warm summer breeze or as violent and vicious as a tornado and wreak utter havoc in your world. Oya is about business and she demands and commands respect!

Oya is associated with the colors: maroon, purple, deep dark red, orange, browns, multi-colors, burgundy, and cooper. Her number is 9 and in astrology is compared to the planet Pluto and the sign Scorpio and her metal of choice is copper.

Some of her foods are: female goat, eggplant, cooked corn meal, grape wine, grapes, gin, rum, kola nuts, plantains, palm oil, rooster, hen, black beans w/rice, anything spicy, fruit, okra soup, fish, cornstarch porridge, and akara.

Icons or effergies associated with Oya are: buffalo’s horns, masks, swords, iruba (horse tail whisk), pennies, whips, anything copper, camwood (which she loves), a broom, pictures of hurricanes, tornadoes, cyclones, wind instruments, anything associated with the wind and she loves cloth.

Her taboos are: smoke, palm kernel oil, ram, pork (depending on your road).

Some ewe (herbs) associated with Oya are: Comfrey, Pleurisy Roots, Horehound, Chickweed, Peony, Elecampane, Royal Poinciana, Star Apple, Flamboyan, Yucca, Caimito, Cypress, and Grains of Paradise just to name a few.

Here are some Oriki/Oyin for Ghede Nimbo, for the Egungun, and for Oya.

Oriki/Orin Ghede Nimbo:

Ghede Nimbo, Ghede Nimbo

Okunrin to bulewa

Ghede Nimbo, Ghede Nimbo

Onibode ile iku

repeat 1st verse

Ghede Nimbo Ghede Nimbo (repeat once)

Ghede Nimbo, Ghede Nimbo

Okunrin to bulewa

Ghede Nimbo Ghede Nimbo

Onibode ile iku

Oriki/Orin Egungun:

Mojuba fefe iku, mojuba fefe iku

Mojuba fefe iku, mojuba fefe iku

Iku o, iku o yin ti lo si joba Egungun

Iku o, iku o yin ti lo si joba Egungun

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Arabara arabara arabara egungun arabara

Arabara arabara arabara egungun arabara (repeat 3 times)

Eegun arabara, eegun arabara, egungun arabara

Repeat 1st verse

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Wole wa Egungun, wole wa . Wole wa Egungun wole wa. Wole wa Egungun wola wa,

o o o wole wa.

Repeat verse

Oriki/Orin Oya:

Oya wima wima, Yansa wima wima oko to bembe aseni Oya

Oya wima wima, Yansa wima wima oko to bembe aseni Oya

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Oya gwa e de, Oya gwa e de

Eegun wan ile Oya gwa e de

Repeat 1st verse

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Oya Oya Ayaba Sango

Oya Oya Ayaba Oyo ile o

Oya Oya Ayaba Sango

Oya Oya Ayaba Oyo ile o

Repeat verse

I could go on and on about my Iya; however, I do not want to seem biased! Being a devoted and humble servant of the Orisa, one must never forget it is not about who dobale or kunles to you, how many ase oke, agbadas or ilekes you have, or how many titles or names you have ~ it is about the Egungun, the Orisa, and Olodumare! It is not about you or me, it is about reverence, worship, and your servitude them. It is about having iwa pele manifest through your daily words and actions. It is about carrying one’s self in a manner that will not shame one’s self, community, Egungun, Orisa, or Olodumare.

I love my mother dearly with all of my heart and each day is a new transformation for me. The power of the Orisa is amazing and I believe it is safe to say that if Oya is your ruling Orisa, we are truly blessed. Even if she is not your Orisa, you are still blessed because you are a child of Olodumare, a child of the Orisa, and your have the ability to contribute something positive to your community or nothing at all.

The author: My name is HRG (Her Royal Grace) Olori (Queen) Oyadele and I greet everyone in the name of the Egungun, the Orisa, and Olodumare. I was initiated and trained to Oya and coronated (as a Queen) in the Republic of Benin, West Africa and I would like to give my insight of Oya from a Beninese perspective.

This article is the sole property of sole property of Her Royal Grace Olori Oyadele. And can not be republished or reproduced in any form without her express permission. Please contact the HRG at: olorioyadele@aol.com

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