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Tag Archive | "Vodou"

Young Haitian-Americans Return to Voodoo

Wednesday, February 11, 2009

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Young Haitian-Americans Return to Voodoo

Voodoo, also spelled vodou, is witnessing a resurgence among younger Haitian-Americans. In southern Florida, where the Haitian community is estimated to be close to 300,000, scholars and voodoo priests say more people in their 20s and 30s are finding the religion.

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Destruction of the African Spirituality and its Subsequent Reconstruction

Saturday, September 6, 2008

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Destruction of the African Spirituality and its Subsequent Reconstruction

This short article by Medahochi tells the story of Traditional African Religion's downfall at the hands of Arabic and European conquerors and indicates a path to its resurrection in the future.

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HRH Oba Adefunmi Ofuntola Adefunmi (Iba T’Orun) and Oyotunji Village

Sunday, June 8, 2008

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(HRH) Oba Adefunmi became a Royal Ancestor on Feb. 11, 2005

In 1959, just before the Revolution, His Royal Highness (HRH) Oba Adefunmi travelled to the Matanzas region of Cuba to be initiated into the priesthood of Obatala.

Upon his return to the U.S. he founded Order of the Damballah Hwedo, then the Shango Temple, and later incorporated the African Theological Archmininstry. That organization would come to be called the Yoruba Temple. His spiritual message was accented by a Black Nationalist message. Though his words rang true in the hearts of many progressive African-Americans, his stance drew large criticsm within the ranks of Cuban priests. A new lineage of Orisa worship that placed Nigeria at it’s core, but that was tailored for African-Americans was formed;Orisa-Voodoo.

In 1970, Oyotunji Village was created in Beaufort County, South Carolina. In 1972, Adefunmi was initiated into the Ifa Priesthood, receiving the rank of Babalawo and later that year was proclaimed Oba (King) of Oyotunji Village. It is noteworthy that in 1981 his status as King was recognized when the Ooni of Ile-Ife arranged for formal coronation rites to be performed for HRH Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi.

Over the years the number of residents at he Village has flucuated, probably hoovering around 5-9 families for the last ten years. Despite this small contigent of residents, the lineage itself is felt throughout the Western world and Africa via a growing number of devotees, chiefs and priests. Oyotunji forever changed the face of Orisa worship in the West.

Books by HRH Adefunmi

Speechs by HRH Adefunmi

Other Books and Academic Works about Adefunmi and Oyotunji Village

More Articles

Resources

Priests, Communities and Organizations Affiliated w/ Oyotunji

(HRH) Oba Adefunmi became a Royal Ancestor on Feb. 11, 2005

In 1959, just before the Revolution, His Royal Highness (HRH) Oba Adefunmi travelled to the Matanzas region of Cuba to be initiated into the priesthood of Obatala.

Upon his return to the U.S. he founded Order of the Damballah Hwedo, then the Shango Temple, and later incorporated the African Theological Archmininstry. That organization would come to be called the Yoruba Temple. His spiritual message was accented by a Black Nationalist message. Though his words rang true in the hearts of many progressive African-Americans, his stance drew large criticsm within the ranks of Cuban priests. A new lineage of Orisa worship that placed Nigeria at it’s core, but that was tailored for African-Americans was formed;Orisa-Voodoo.

In 1970, Oyotunji Village was created in Beaufort County, South Carolina. In 1972, Adefunmi was initiated into the Ifa Priesthood, receiving the rank of Babalawo and later that year was proclaimed Oba (King) of Oyotunji Village. It is noteworthy that in 1981 his status as King was recognized when the Ooni of Ile-Ife arranged for formal coronation rites to be performed for HRH Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi.

Over the years the number of residents at he Village has flucuated, probably hoovering around 5-9 families for the last ten years. Despite this small contigent of residents, the lineage itself is felt throughout the Western world and Africa via a growing number of devotees, chiefs and priests. Oyotunji forever changed the face of Orisa worship in the West.

Books by HRH Adefunmi

Speechs by HRH Adefunmi

Other Books and Academic Works about Adefunmi and Oyotunji Village

More Articles

Resources

Priests, Communities and Organizations Affiliated w/ Oyotunji

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Healer wants recognition for Haiti’s Vodou

Thursday, June 5, 2008

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Healer wants recognition for Haiti’s Vodou

Max Beauvoir, 68, of the Temple of Yehwe in Mariani, Haiti, said politicians, humanitarian organisations, and Christian leaders from abroad have refused to acknowledge the role of the religion in the country's culture for 200 years. As a result, Haiti is on the brink of total collapse, and he believes Vodou gods are upset.

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