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Tag Archive | "Pioneer"

Interview with Mae Stella Oxóssi

Friday, March 13, 2009

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Interview with Mae Stella Oxóssi

In a morning of Wednesday, between a query and another, Mother of Stella Oxóssi received us in the house of Xangô and talked about the priesthood, the history of Candomblé in Bahia and Ilê terreiro Axé OPO Afonjá. The conversation was not long, because, as always, a queue of people waiting for their advice.

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HRH Oba Adefunmi Ofuntola Adefunmi (Iba T’Orun) and Oyotunji Village

Sunday, June 8, 2008

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(HRH) Oba Adefunmi became a Royal Ancestor on Feb. 11, 2005

In 1959, just before the Revolution, His Royal Highness (HRH) Oba Adefunmi travelled to the Matanzas region of Cuba to be initiated into the priesthood of Obatala.

Upon his return to the U.S. he founded Order of the Damballah Hwedo, then the Shango Temple, and later incorporated the African Theological Archmininstry. That organization would come to be called the Yoruba Temple. His spiritual message was accented by a Black Nationalist message. Though his words rang true in the hearts of many progressive African-Americans, his stance drew large criticsm within the ranks of Cuban priests. A new lineage of Orisa worship that placed Nigeria at it’s core, but that was tailored for African-Americans was formed;Orisa-Voodoo.

In 1970, Oyotunji Village was created in Beaufort County, South Carolina. In 1972, Adefunmi was initiated into the Ifa Priesthood, receiving the rank of Babalawo and later that year was proclaimed Oba (King) of Oyotunji Village. It is noteworthy that in 1981 his status as King was recognized when the Ooni of Ile-Ife arranged for formal coronation rites to be performed for HRH Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi.

Over the years the number of residents at he Village has flucuated, probably hoovering around 5-9 families for the last ten years. Despite this small contigent of residents, the lineage itself is felt throughout the Western world and Africa via a growing number of devotees, chiefs and priests. Oyotunji forever changed the face of Orisa worship in the West.

Books by HRH Adefunmi

Speechs by HRH Adefunmi

Other Books and Academic Works about Adefunmi and Oyotunji Village

More Articles

Resources

Priests, Communities and Organizations Affiliated w/ Oyotunji

(HRH) Oba Adefunmi became a Royal Ancestor on Feb. 11, 2005

In 1959, just before the Revolution, His Royal Highness (HRH) Oba Adefunmi travelled to the Matanzas region of Cuba to be initiated into the priesthood of Obatala.

Upon his return to the U.S. he founded Order of the Damballah Hwedo, then the Shango Temple, and later incorporated the African Theological Archmininstry. That organization would come to be called the Yoruba Temple. His spiritual message was accented by a Black Nationalist message. Though his words rang true in the hearts of many progressive African-Americans, his stance drew large criticsm within the ranks of Cuban priests. A new lineage of Orisa worship that placed Nigeria at it’s core, but that was tailored for African-Americans was formed;Orisa-Voodoo.

In 1970, Oyotunji Village was created in Beaufort County, South Carolina. In 1972, Adefunmi was initiated into the Ifa Priesthood, receiving the rank of Babalawo and later that year was proclaimed Oba (King) of Oyotunji Village. It is noteworthy that in 1981 his status as King was recognized when the Ooni of Ile-Ife arranged for formal coronation rites to be performed for HRH Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi.

Over the years the number of residents at he Village has flucuated, probably hoovering around 5-9 families for the last ten years. Despite this small contigent of residents, the lineage itself is felt throughout the Western world and Africa via a growing number of devotees, chiefs and priests. Oyotunji forever changed the face of Orisa worship in the West.

Books by HRH Adefunmi

Speechs by HRH Adefunmi

Other Books and Academic Works about Adefunmi and Oyotunji Village

More Articles

Resources

Priests, Communities and Organizations Affiliated w/ Oyotunji

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When I was 30: Adekola Adedapo, 56, jazz singer and educator

Friday, June 6, 2008

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In 1978, Adekola sold everything she owned, including her mink coat, leaving Milwaukee to move to the Oyotunji commune in South Carolina. "I gave all that stuff away. My boyfriend said, 'She's lost it ... she's giving away all her stuff,'?" Adekola said. A civil rights activist and member of the Black Power movement, Adekola went to the village to connect with her African ancestry and to abandon the constraints of what she saw as a diseased American establishment.

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Nana Yao Opare Dinizulu I Biography

Wednesday, May 7, 2008

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Nana Yao Opare Dinizulu I Biography

In 1965, the late Nana Yao Opare Dinizulu I (born Gus Edwards), went to the Akonedi Shrine in Ghana and determined his cultural and spiritual lineage to be Akan. While there he initiation was recommended through divination and he submitted. He received and transported for the sake of opening a temple in the U.S. the shrines of Nana Asuo Gyebi, Esi Ketewaa and Adade Kofi. In 1967, he established the first Akom in American, Bosum Dzemawodzi. It is located in New York, but has gone on to expand into the D.C/Maryland area and has excellent relations with other Akan temples that share common lineage in Africa.

Prior to his passing Nana Dinizulu was named Omanhene and Okomfohene of Akans in America, recognizing his role in introducing Akan spirituality to the U.S.

Photographs

Nana Yao Opare Dinizulu I & Akonedi Shrine in Ghana

On-line Resources

In 1965, the late Nana Yao Opare Dinizulu I (born Gus Edwards), went to the Akonedi Shrine in Ghana and determined his cultural and spiritual lineage to be Akan. While there he initiation was recommended through divination and he submitted. He received and transported for the sake of opening a temple in the U.S. the shrines of Nana Asuo Gyebi, Esi Ketewaa and Adade Kofi. In 1967, he established the first Akom in American, Bosum Dzemawodzi. It is located in New York, but has gone on to expand into the D.C/Maryland area and has excellent relations with other Akan temples that share common lineage in Africa.

Prior to his passing Nana Dinizulu was named Omanhene and Okomfohene of Akans in America, recognizing his role in introducing Akan spirituality to the U.S.

Photographs

Nana Yao Opare Dinizulu I & Akonedi Shrine in Ghana

On-line Resources

Continue reading...