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Tag Archive | "oyotunji"

Voodoo alive in South Carolina

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

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Voodoo alive in South Carolina

A sign used to grace the entrance to this place, Oyotunji, alerting visitors that they were leaving the United States and entering a sacred Yoruba voodoo village. That hand-lettered marker currently is in the shop for refurbishment, but the king here assures visitors that the message still applies.

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Survival And Resurgence Of The Yoruba In The Americas

Monday, December 21, 2009

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Survival And Resurgence Of The Yoruba In The Americas

The effects that the slave trade and colonization and surviving indigenous traditions of Africa in the U.S.

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Blood, honor and the fair weather goat

Friday, March 20, 2009

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Blood, honor and the fair weather goat

Nestled snugly in a wooded patch of Beaufort County, South Carolina, Oyotunji Village sprawls over a 10-acre kingdom, complete with a king, a royal palace, open air shrines, courtyards and a bazaar. More than 20 people live in the village, and dozens more participate in the many religious festivals held during the year. Tourists seeking divination and other forms of spiritual advice bring in revenue for the village.

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It takes an African village in S.C.

Monday, March 16, 2009

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It takes an African village in S.C.

“Oyotunji became a hub of African culture in the United States,” Oba Adefunmi II said. “It’s a snapshot of what the African village and life is like. That is what they are celebrating this week. - People suffering from cultural amnesia find themselves at our gates.”

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An African kingdom in America – Kingdom of Oyotunji

Wednesday, July 9, 2008

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Pass through the gates and enter the Kingdom of Oyotunji, Nigeria. Capital of the Yoruba people of the Western Hemisphere, Oyotunji welcomes visitors with a sign that reads, "You are now leaving the United States and entering this Kingdom." Once you have entered, you are, for all purposes, in Nigeria.

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HRH Oba Adefunmi Ofuntola Adefunmi (Iba T’Orun) and Oyotunji Village

Sunday, June 8, 2008

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(HRH) Oba Adefunmi became a Royal Ancestor on Feb. 11, 2005

In 1959, just before the Revolution, His Royal Highness (HRH) Oba Adefunmi travelled to the Matanzas region of Cuba to be initiated into the priesthood of Obatala.

Upon his return to the U.S. he founded Order of the Damballah Hwedo, then the Shango Temple, and later incorporated the African Theological Archmininstry. That organization would come to be called the Yoruba Temple. His spiritual message was accented by a Black Nationalist message. Though his words rang true in the hearts of many progressive African-Americans, his stance drew large criticsm within the ranks of Cuban priests. A new lineage of Orisa worship that placed Nigeria at it’s core, but that was tailored for African-Americans was formed;Orisa-Voodoo.

In 1970, Oyotunji Village was created in Beaufort County, South Carolina. In 1972, Adefunmi was initiated into the Ifa Priesthood, receiving the rank of Babalawo and later that year was proclaimed Oba (King) of Oyotunji Village. It is noteworthy that in 1981 his status as King was recognized when the Ooni of Ile-Ife arranged for formal coronation rites to be performed for HRH Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi.

Over the years the number of residents at he Village has flucuated, probably hoovering around 5-9 families for the last ten years. Despite this small contigent of residents, the lineage itself is felt throughout the Western world and Africa via a growing number of devotees, chiefs and priests. Oyotunji forever changed the face of Orisa worship in the West.

Books by HRH Adefunmi

Speechs by HRH Adefunmi

Other Books and Academic Works about Adefunmi and Oyotunji Village

More Articles

Resources

Priests, Communities and Organizations Affiliated w/ Oyotunji

(HRH) Oba Adefunmi became a Royal Ancestor on Feb. 11, 2005

In 1959, just before the Revolution, His Royal Highness (HRH) Oba Adefunmi travelled to the Matanzas region of Cuba to be initiated into the priesthood of Obatala.

Upon his return to the U.S. he founded Order of the Damballah Hwedo, then the Shango Temple, and later incorporated the African Theological Archmininstry. That organization would come to be called the Yoruba Temple. His spiritual message was accented by a Black Nationalist message. Though his words rang true in the hearts of many progressive African-Americans, his stance drew large criticsm within the ranks of Cuban priests. A new lineage of Orisa worship that placed Nigeria at it’s core, but that was tailored for African-Americans was formed;Orisa-Voodoo.

In 1970, Oyotunji Village was created in Beaufort County, South Carolina. In 1972, Adefunmi was initiated into the Ifa Priesthood, receiving the rank of Babalawo and later that year was proclaimed Oba (King) of Oyotunji Village. It is noteworthy that in 1981 his status as King was recognized when the Ooni of Ile-Ife arranged for formal coronation rites to be performed for HRH Oba Ofuntola Oseijeman Adelabu Adefunmi.

Over the years the number of residents at he Village has flucuated, probably hoovering around 5-9 families for the last ten years. Despite this small contigent of residents, the lineage itself is felt throughout the Western world and Africa via a growing number of devotees, chiefs and priests. Oyotunji forever changed the face of Orisa worship in the West.

Books by HRH Adefunmi

Speechs by HRH Adefunmi

Other Books and Academic Works about Adefunmi and Oyotunji Village

More Articles

Resources

Priests, Communities and Organizations Affiliated w/ Oyotunji

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Brothers share African heritage with students

Friday, June 6, 2008

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Sade Ogulano, Jobi and Ojotosu Olamina each were born to and raised by father Olomide Ogunlano and mother Omi Ajamu in the only traditional African village in North America, The Kingdom of Oyotunji African Village in Sheldon, S.C. A replica village for one in their native country, the settlement located 50 miles north of Savannah, Ga, was established in 1970 by the African Theological Archministry, Inc., to welcome those interested in studying Yoruba, the cultural tradition of art and expression for those with ties to this region.

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When I was 30: Adekola Adedapo, 56, jazz singer and educator

Friday, June 6, 2008

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In 1978, Adekola sold everything she owned, including her mink coat, leaving Milwaukee to move to the Oyotunji commune in South Carolina. "I gave all that stuff away. My boyfriend said, 'She's lost it ... she's giving away all her stuff,'?" Adekola said. A civil rights activist and member of the Black Power movement, Adekola went to the village to connect with her African ancestry and to abandon the constraints of what she saw as a diseased American establishment.

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Founders of Various Traditional African Spiritual Lineages in U.S.

Tuesday, March 25, 2008

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Founders of Various Traditional African Spiritual Lineages in U.S.

Many trailblazers contributed to the spread of African religion in the United States. Three individuals played especially invaluable roles in starting some of the most well known U.S. African-American lineages.

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Oyotunji Village Photographs

Friday, March 9, 2007

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Oyotunji Village Photographs

This is a small Oyotunji Village photo gallery featuring public domain images.

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