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Tag Archive | "Legal Issues"

Sacrificers: It’s religion, not abuse

Sunday, December 20, 2009

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Sacrificers: It’s religion, not abuse

Animal rights activists continue their disrespectful, racist and eurocentric (and futile) efforts at defining what animal sacrifice is and isn't.

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Texas Priest Can Resume Animal Sacrifices…for Now

Thursday, August 27, 2009

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Texas Priest Can Resume Animal Sacrifices…for Now

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has overturned a district court’s ruling, paving the way for Jose Merced, a Santeria priest and Puerto Rico native, resideing in Euless to resume animal sacrifices as part of his religious ceremonies.

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UPDATED: Animal Cruelty Case Goes to Court

Sunday, May 17, 2009

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UPDATED: Animal Cruelty Case Goes to Court

Prosecutors dropped animal cruelty charges Thursday against a man who was sacrificing animals in his Lawndale home for religious purposes.

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Legal Loophole Threatens Animal Sacrifice?

Wednesday, December 17, 2008

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Legal Loophole Threatens Animal Sacrifice?

Across the country law enforcement are ignoring a Supreme Court judgement that protects the religious right to perform animal sacrifice. They are seeking to charge individuals with animal cruelty if the remains of animals are found in public areas.

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Religious Icons Threaten Jamaica Bay?

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

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Religious Icons Threaten Jamaica Bay?

An isolated beach on Jamaica Bay has become an eyesore, littered with religious icons and the gruesome remnants of animal sacrifices, area residents complain.

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Santeria: Guilty Until Proven Innocent?

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

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Santeria: Guilty Until Proven Innocent?

A woman is telling a tall tale of a non-existent Santeria Voodoo, church members that abducted her and a MacGyver-like escape out of the movies. The Flager and St. Johns Sheriffs are buying the story - and it appears that Santeria will pay the cost of admission.

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Animal Cruelty or Catholic Insecurities?

Thursday, August 28, 2008

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A Westchester man and his son have been charged with animal cruelty associated with the housing of several farm animals. The police have called in The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), an organization that especially biased and intolerant towards African Religions, to help with the investigation.

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Label the Elderly Witches?

Thursday, August 21, 2008

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It is almost a crime to grow old in some parts of the Kenya, and the ‘victims’ are labelled witches — for which they are liable to suffer mob-justice or other forms of maltreatment.

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Expert: Goat decapitations likely a prank

Monday, August 11, 2008

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Apparently, we need “experts” outside of our traditions to tell the authorities about us, what we do and when we’re safe. This article is about a professor that is dispelling a rumor that a recent goat beheading was involving Santeria or Palo.

I suppose we should be grateful the professor got involved, but all I can think is “and who are? and why are you speaking on behalf?”

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Expert: Goat decapitations likely a prank

African religions do not call for discarding dead animals in public places, says Dr. Eoghan C. Ballard
Daily News

People have a tendency to fear the unknown.

That’s what one scholar of African-based religions believes is the case with the local goat decapitations.

First, there were whispers the headless goats were being along local streets as some sort of pagan ritual. Now, rumors are surfacing of Santeria and Palo Mayombe involvement in the beheadings.

“It is far more likely, even in Florida, that such activity is caused by teenagers looking for thrills or some disturbed individual, than from any Afro-diasporic religious activity,” Dr. Eoghan C. Ballard, an expert on Afro-diasporic studies, said in an e-mail.

Ballard said that “paleros,” or Congo priests, are very discreet in their practices and prefer not to call attention to themselves. Authentic Palo practices require little in the way of sacrifice. Most sacrifices are used for celebratory meals.

“From my experience, both in the U.S. and in Cuba, there are no discernable reasons for a Palero to leave a decapitated goat head on a city street,” Ballard said.

Ballard is a professor who did his doctoral research on Central African religions in the Americas at the University of Pennsylvania.

When paleros do sacrifice animals, they do it to feed their “nganga,” or ritual vessel. Ballard said there only is one form of nganga that would be fed a goat, and the head of the animal would most likely be placed in a religious temple, not on a street. Also, Ballard said it is very unlikely that someone would be feeding the only nganga that “eats” a goat more than one or two times a year.

In all of his experience, goats used as sacrifices have also been eaten at festivals, he added.

The only animal to be disposed of away from a temple would be a rooster or hen used to treat someone with a serious illness, Ballard said. Even then, it would be done in a way that a casual passerby would not see it.

“Of course, it is completely possible that somebody with little substantive idea of these traditions is attempting to imitate it,” Ballard said.

Ballard dispelled theories suggesting Santeria or Palo spells. He said when paleros use spells that require an item to be placed somewhere, it is usually small, inconspicuous and intentionally unidentifiable.

As for the azaleas and plants that have been found in the animals’ mouths, Ballard said azaleas have no specific meaning in Palo, although goats or rams are often given straw or grass to eat before they are sacrificed.

“I suspect this is either a game someone is playing, or the work of another disturbed individual,” Ballard said. “There’s nothing in Palo that would justify doing this.”

Daily News Staff Writer Robbyn Brooks can be reached at 863-1111, Ext. 1445.

Source: NWFDailyNews

Apparently, we need “experts” outside of our traditions to tell the authorities about us, what we do and when we’re safe. This article is about a professor that is dispelling a rumor that a recent goat beheading was involving Santeria or Palo.

I suppose we should be grateful the professor got involved, but all I can think is “and who are? and why are you speaking on behalf?”

————–

Expert: Goat decapitations likely a prank

African religions do not call for discarding dead animals in public places, says Dr. Eoghan C. Ballard
Daily News

People have a tendency to fear the unknown.

That’s what one scholar of African-based religions believes is the case with the local goat decapitations.

First, there were whispers the headless goats were being along local streets as some sort of pagan ritual. Now, rumors are surfacing of Santeria and Palo Mayombe involvement in the beheadings.

“It is far more likely, even in Florida, that such activity is caused by teenagers looking for thrills or some disturbed individual, than from any Afro-diasporic religious activity,” Dr. Eoghan C. Ballard, an expert on Afro-diasporic studies, said in an e-mail.

Ballard said that “paleros,” or Congo priests, are very discreet in their practices and prefer not to call attention to themselves. Authentic Palo practices require little in the way of sacrifice. Most sacrifices are used for celebratory meals.

“From my experience, both in the U.S. and in Cuba, there are no discernable reasons for a Palero to leave a decapitated goat head on a city street,” Ballard said.

Ballard is a professor who did his doctoral research on Central African religions in the Americas at the University of Pennsylvania.

When paleros do sacrifice animals, they do it to feed their “nganga,” or ritual vessel. Ballard said there only is one form of nganga that would be fed a goat, and the head of the animal would most likely be placed in a religious temple, not on a street. Also, Ballard said it is very unlikely that someone would be feeding the only nganga that “eats” a goat more than one or two times a year.

In all of his experience, goats used as sacrifices have also been eaten at festivals, he added.

The only animal to be disposed of away from a temple would be a rooster or hen used to treat someone with a serious illness, Ballard said. Even then, it would be done in a way that a casual passerby would not see it.

“Of course, it is completely possible that somebody with little substantive idea of these traditions is attempting to imitate it,” Ballard said.

Ballard dispelled theories suggesting Santeria or Palo spells. He said when paleros use spells that require an item to be placed somewhere, it is usually small, inconspicuous and intentionally unidentifiable.

As for the azaleas and plants that have been found in the animals’ mouths, Ballard said azaleas have no specific meaning in Palo, although goats or rams are often given straw or grass to eat before they are sacrificed.

“I suspect this is either a game someone is playing, or the work of another disturbed individual,” Ballard said. “There’s nothing in Palo that would justify doing this.”

Daily News Staff Writer Robbyn Brooks can be reached at 863-1111, Ext. 1445.

Source: NWFDailyNews

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News Spreads Fast: Police Should Use Restraint

Tuesday, July 29, 2008

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As reported previously, Miami-Dade Police Officers are being asked to exercise good common sense and knowledge of the law when dealing with Orisa worshippers.

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