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Tag Archive | "Candomble"

Interview with Mae Stella Oxóssi

Friday, March 13, 2009

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Interview with Mae Stella Oxóssi

In a morning of Wednesday, between a query and another, Mother of Stella Oxóssi received us in the house of Xangô and talked about the priesthood, the history of Candomblé in Bahia and Ilê terreiro Axé OPO Afonjá. The conversation was not long, because, as always, a queue of people waiting for their advice.

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Candomble: Several Considerations

Friday, March 13, 2009

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Candomble: Several Considerations

The 300-year history of Negro enslavement in Brazil shows, before all else, the resistence, the organization of the Negroes. The African culture survived, for them, through their belief, through their religion. What one believes, desires, is stronger than what one experiences whenever there is a limit situation.

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Candomble Film Highlights Mae Stella

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

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Candomble Film Highlights Mae Stella

The documentary film A Cidade das Mulheres (The City of Women) directed by Lazaro Faria, presents an intimate view of African religious traditions in Bahia, Brazil. It features Mae Stella de Oxossi, perhaps the most influential figure in Bahia’s Candomble community.

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Bahia Gov’t Confisicates Anti-Candomble Book

Tuesday, July 8, 2008

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Bahia Gov’t Confisicates Anti-Candomble Book

The state of Bahia in Brazil has confiscated all copies of the book "Yes, Yes! No, No! Reflections on Healing and Liberation" on the grounds that it makes false and prejudicial statements about the Afro-Brazilian religions of Candomble and Umbanda, and incites readers to destroy their objects of worship in the name of Catholicism.

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Candomble and Time

Tuesday, July 8, 2008

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Afro-Brazilian religions, constituted from African traditions brought by slaves, still cultivate a notion of time that is very different from “our” time, that of the West and of capitalism (Fabian 1985). Because of its link with the notion of life and death and concepts of this world and the next, the notion of time is essential to the constitution of religion.

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Priestly Payout

Thursday, June 5, 2008

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Latin Trade, Dec, 2000 by Andrew Downie

THE HIGH PRIESTS AND PRIESTESSES OF Brazil’s candomble religion are getting formal recognition–and pensions to go along with it.

Recent changes in the law bring purveyors of the Afro-Brazilian religion into line with Roman Catholic clergy and allow the white-robed female priests, or Maes-de-santo, and their male counterparts, Paes-de-santo, to qualify for state-paid retirement benefits.

“We are changing the law because it was discriminatory,” says an adviser to the country’s social security minister. “Before, it only covered Roman Catholic and Protestant priests and ministers. Now any religious priests can apply for pensions.”

Even though they have not contributed to the social security fund, Candomble priests will be eligible for a monthly stipend of about US$89 after they reach age 67. Brazilians who pay into the fund receive a higher pension, with men qualifying at age 65 and women at 60.

Latin Trade, Dec, 2000 by Andrew Downie

THE HIGH PRIESTS AND PRIESTESSES OF Brazil’s candomble religion are getting formal recognition–and pensions to go along with it.

Recent changes in the law bring purveyors of the Afro-Brazilian religion into line with Roman Catholic clergy and allow the white-robed female priests, or Maes-de-santo, and their male counterparts, Paes-de-santo, to qualify for state-paid retirement benefits.

“We are changing the law because it was discriminatory,” says an adviser to the country’s social security minister. “Before, it only covered Roman Catholic and Protestant priests and ministers. Now any religious priests can apply for pensions.”

Even though they have not contributed to the social security fund, Candomble priests will be eligible for a monthly stipend of about US$89 after they reach age 67. Brazilians who pay into the fund receive a higher pension, with men qualifying at age 65 and women at 60.

Continue reading...